24 March 2002

Definitions for a new economy: Hiat-list (hy-AIT-list), intrans.v. where writers in limbo take their bylines while they find out whether a particular magazine lives or dies: “Wool Socks Weekly loved Chester’s article pitch on ‘Top Ten Argyle-Wearing Celebrities,’ but he’s been hiat-listed while the publisher begs investors for another round of funding.” (Etymology “hiatus” Am.Eng “indefinite cessation with frankly unpromising promise of return” + “waitlist” Am.Eng “I sure know a lot of folk in this situation; feels like college admissions all over again”) Spread the word!

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24 March 2002

20 March 2002

Here’s an interesting item, in which a writer with a major vested interest in a story criticizes another newspaper for having a vested interest in the story. Not that I’m rushing to the defense of the Seattle Times here (the story was terrific, but the Blethen family, its owner, is an evil pack of union-busting bastards) but… the Wall Street Journal op-ed page? If Ms. Landro had any information proving the story was false or flawed, wouldn’t she have run an article in the far more reputable WSJ news section? (UPDATE 7 April 02: Salon’s on the case.)

20 March 2002